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FAQ A to Z listing

FAQ

Where you see this symbol FAQ you can submit a question and we will add the answer to our pool of Frequently Asked Questions for the benefit of other users. Whilst using the website if you come across a term or word you do not understand, then you can submit it to our glossary and we will provide an explanation, which again will help other users. We try to use plain language where possible and your feedback will help. Thank you.

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FAQ Answer
I have a problem tenant - what can I do?

There is advice on what to do about problem tenants on the Direct Gov website.

I own an empty property - what can I do about it?

The Empty Homes Agency provide advice on what to do if you own an empty property and you want to bring it back into use.

You will also need to notify the Council Tax section on 0194659 8600. Please also read the attached leaflet that has more information.

If I make a Building Notice application, will the Building Control Officer tell me how to carry out the work during his first visit?

No, although we are always willing offer help and advice but you should not expect to use the Building Control Officer as a substitute for an architect or designer.

If you are not confident that you (or your builder) are fully conversant with the requirements of the regulations, then we would strongly advise that you do not use a Building Notice application.

If you do not check plans on Building Notice applications, why are the charges the same as for Full Plans Applications?

As no plan check is made, additional reliance is placed on the inspection stage of the process to ensure the Building Regulations are complied with.

This translates into a requirement for either more inspections being necessary, or the inspections made taking longer than would be the case with a Full Plans application; hence the total cost is the same.

Is a building regulation completion certificate the same as a guarantee or warranty?

No. The completion certificate simply confirms that, as far as the Local Authority has been able to ascertain, the work on-site complies with the current Building Regulations. This means that inspections will need to have been carried out at the appropriate times, and that any problems found were put right. The Local Authority does not provide a guarantee or warranty on the work.

If you are buying a new or altered property, always make sure your solicitor checks that a completion certificate has been issued for the work. This is particularly important as if defects are found later; it may be you who is responsible for correcting them rather than the previous owner!