Discover the Mysteries of Victorian Whitehaven

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Go back in time with the team at the Beacon Museum this weekend (Saturday July 11) and explore industrial Victorian Whitehaven as part of the National Festival of Archaeology.

The Mysteries of Victorian Whitehaven is part of the national celebration, co-ordinated by the Council for British Archaeology.

The festival offers over 1,000 events nationwide, organised by museums, heritage organisations, national and country parks, universities, local societies, and community archaeologists.

Also, the team at the Beacon Museum are providing an opportunity to learn what life was like for those living and working around the port in the 1800s, and how they survived without electric or sanitation.

The Mysteries of Victorian Whitehaven will provide visitors with the chance to handle real Victorian objects and discover what they are and how they work, through archaeology.

The day will enable locals and visitors to discover the amazing history of Whitehaven and hear stories of historic figures who changed the look and feel of the historic town and harbour.

Alan Gillon, Learning Officer from the Beacon Museum, said: “With the National Festival of Archaeology celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, we decided to celebrate by running five special trails as a festivity of Whitehaven’s archaeological past.

“Harbour trails will start from the Beacon Museum at 10am, 11am, 1pm, 2pm and 3pm, lasting one hour each. Free mystery objects and Victorian handling sessions will also be running throughout the day in the Museum, suitable for adults and children to enjoy and discover.”

The Beacon Museum admission includes a free harbour trial in the price: £5.50 for adults, £4 for concessions and £2 for children, free to annual pass members. Tours are not access friendly due to steps and uneven surfaces, and there is no need to book in advance, although each guided trail is limited to 15 places. Call the museum 01946 592302 for further details.

Published: 7 July 2015 - 4:03pm