Dog nuisance

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In general, people are allowed to keep animals, as long as they do not cause a nuisance or a health hazard to other people and premises around them.

This page outlines what can be done when this is not the case.

Noise nuisance

If the amount of barking prevents those who live nearby from enjoying or undertaking normal living in their own property then it can be classed as a nuisance. Unfortunately, dog noise is not like loud music or revving car engines, it cannot just be turned off.

Dogs usually bark when something or someone invades their space, but this becomes a problem when barking continues or when a dog barks for no reason.

There is a set procedure which the Council must follow when investigating a complaint such as this. When you contact us to report a complaint of dog noise, we will send you out some monitoring sheets to complete so that we can establish the best time to monitor the noise and gather extra evidence.

We work closely with Environmental Health to tackle this problem, and also with the owner to prevent or reduce the barking to an acceptable level.

Reporting noise nuisance

If you would like to report an incident of noise nuisance, please contact us by email to or by calling 0845 054 8600.

Smell nuisance

Smells caused by inadequate cleaning can also prevent neighbours from enjoying their property. If your property is found to be causing a smell nuisance you can be prosecuted under The Environmental Protection Act 1990.

Failing to clean up after your dog has fouled in an enclosed area can lead to an unpleasant build up which causes flies and smell. This can be easily remedied by routinely removing faeces and disinfecting the area. Dog dirt can be easily disposed of. Simply bag it, and place in your domestic bin on a daily basis.

Reporting smell nuisance

If you would like to report an incident of smell nuisance, please contact us by email to or by calling 0845 054 8600.

Housing Association tenants

If you live in a housing association property, you are bound by a contract of tenancy (part of which is a tenancy agreement), which prevents you from causing nuisance or health hazards by keeping animals.

Published: 11 February 2014 - 3:16pm